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Posts Tagged ‘Academic cheating’

Cheating.  About 99.9% of humanity does it at one time or another. It’s common in education.  It’s common in business.  It’s common everywhere.

Accounting is one profession where honesty and integrity is part of the job description.  Yet, cheating exists.  A friend, former accountant and CFO Sam Antar, orchestrated much of the splashiest fraud of the 1980s at Crazy Eddie. Accountant cheating, as in financial statement manipulation, is pandemic.

In my surfing, I came across a website with this catchy banner:

Pic credit: WeTakeYourClass.com

WeTakeYourClass will take your on-line class and guarantee at least a grade of B.  It says it will get you an A 99% of the time. It specializes in taking math, business and sciences.  It specifically mentions accounting.

It is frustrating for me to know that while I spend my life trying to teach students to do the right thing, there are people trying to get them to do the wrong thing.

Pic credit: WeTakeYourClass.com

The site claims to get a student an A about 99% of the time, and it also claims to be risk free to the student. Are they being honest about cheating?

A comment to a similar story at Carpe Diem says, “I … found out that there are many sites that offer this service. One quotes a fee a low as $695 for grad level courses and only $430 for undergrad economics courses.”  Hey, that’s affordable.

If you are a student and are reading this, please don’t do it.

I prefer F2F classes where a student can look you in the eye while he/she cheats.  It’s more honest that way.

Thanks to Jim Ulvog for the tip.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht


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A meme is an image or recording packaged in such a way as to communicate a message or capture the fancy of those who see/view/hear it.  It is communicated via the Internet.   Their explosive impact has come of age in today’s social media world.

A few minutes ago I received an e-mail from Auntie Bev, into which she had pasted several meme images.  One caught my eye, and I’ve since been able to determine that it’s a true viral phenomenon, posted to thousands of blogs and Facebook accounts.

I’m not sure about the message of this meme.  Perhaps it is that some cheaters are unstoppable.  Or, masterful cheating is admirable.  Perhaps the message is that because cheating is unstoppable, it’s OK to do it.

Using my screen capture utility, I have snipped the following image from another viral meme.  It delivers quite a different message.

I suppose the message for this one is that opportunistic cheating is everywhere.  Or, it might be that cheating is due to teacher carelessness.  Whatever, the meme is funny.  Darn kids.  If this one would only try to learn as much as he tries to cheat.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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Accounting Education is a British journal published by Taylor & Francis, a profit seeking company. It has just released its issue for June, 2012 (Vol. 21, No 3).  This issue is devoted to academic cheating by students (but not by faculty) and their sensitivity to ethical issues.  A few of the articles sound very interesting.  I would read the entire issue if not for the price.

There are six articles and one editorial.  The download fee is $36 USD per article/essay, or $275 for the entire issue.

Guest Editorial 

  • Academic Dishonesty, Cheating Behaviour and Other Forms of Inappropriate Conduct
    Kenneth J. Smith & Malcolm Smith

Original Articles

  • A Longitudinal Study of Accounting Students’ Ethical Judgement Making Ability
    Maisarah Mohamed Saat, Stacey Porter & Gordon Woodbine
  • The Impact of Honour Codes and Perceptions of Cheating on Academic Cheating Behaviours, Especially for MBA Bound Undergraduates
    Heather M. O’Neill & Christian A. Pfeiffer
  • Challenges to Academic Integrity: Identifying the Factors Associated With the Cheating Chain
    Richard A. Bernardi, Caitlin A. Banzhoff, Abigail M. Martino & Katelyn J. Savasta
  • To Cheat or Not to Cheat: Rationalizing Academic Impropriety
    Jason MacGregor & Martin Stuebs
  • Perceptions of Authorial Identity in Academic Writing among Undergraduate Accounting Students: Implications for Unintentional Plagiarism
    Joan Ballantine & Patricia McCourt Larres
  • Unethical and Deadly Symbiosis in Higher Education
    D. Larry Crumbley, Ronald Flinn & Kenneth J. Reichelt

$275 is a bit pricey for me.  I might pay $15 or $20 to read them all.  If subscribing for a firm, an academic unit or a library, the price is $1,349 USD per year (six issues per year).  And people wonder why no one ever reads a professor’s published academic article.

Truly, I would like to read some of these papers, but the price is simply too high.  I think something needs to be done with the financing model of academic publications.  In this age of the Internet, too many commentaries and research papers are available inexpensively.  Maintaining artificially high prices restricts reader access.  If accounting professors are business professors, why is it that we seem to be ignorant of the law of supply and demand.

Moreover, why is there no blog for this journal?  In a blog researchers could interpret their findings for the public.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht


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