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Posts Tagged ‘Accountant’s Day’

The 2010 Bean Counter Contest is now history.  A student at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, has been declared the winner.

The Bean Counter Contest was created to promote interest in Accountant’s Day (aka International Accounting Day), held each year on November 10.  This year, ProfAlbrecht purchased a glass jar (approximately ½ gallon)  and filled it with Brach’s jelly beans.

The guess closest to the actual count of 721 jelly beans was entered by Catherine.  Her guess of 700 jelly beans was easily the best when compared to all other entries.

This year, 74 four entries were received.  Estimates ranged from a low of 51 to a high of 1,999.  The average number of beans guessed was 461, and the median guess was 370.

The official tally is:

Catherine has won the following:

  1. bag of jelly beans
  2. bag of M&M peanuts
  3. toothbrush

Congratulations, Catherine!  I hope you had a great Accountant’s Day.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

 

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To commemorate Accountant’s Day on Wednesday, November 10, 2010, The Summa is conducting its first annual Bean Counters Contest.

If you can correctly guess the number of jelly beans in this jar (net of any allowances (the beans I eat while counting)), you will win:

  1. bag of jelly beans
  2. bag of M&M peanuts
  3. toothbrush

Entries are accepted by e-mail to albrecht@profalbrecht.com or by commenting to this blog post.  Entries must be received by 11:59 p.m. CT, November 10, 2010.  Entries must contain contestant’s name and e-mail address.  Number of expected winning entries:  one.  In case of multiple winning entries, the two entries with the earliest time stamp will be declared the winners.  The jar contains items other than jelly beans, such as Hershey’s kisses.  These are for me to eat while counting.  Your task is to count only the beans in the jar.  Limit of one entry per person.

Concordia student Josh holds onto official jar while ProfAlbrecht looks on.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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Recent DNA results raise doubt that Pacioli fathers accounting.

November 10 is when we celebrate Accountant’s Day.  I recently wrote,

On November 10, 1494, volume 2 of Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalita (Everything About Arithmetic, Geometry and Proportion) was published.  It is in volume 2 of the Summa that Luca Pacioli included a description of the bookkeeping/accounting system of Venice.   In honor of this contribution, Pacioli has carried for centuries the title of Father of Accounting.

Pacioli, though, never claimed to invent anything related to accounting.  In an attempt to refute paternity, Pacioli consented to a DNA test.

New Mexico State University accounting professor (and master accounting humorist) Ed Scribner writes, “Recent DNA evidence reveals that Pacioli is not actually the Father of Accounting …”

Accounting researcher Dan Stone from the University of Kentucky agrees, “Recent DNA evidence indicates that while Pacioli is not actually the Father of Accounting, he is the Father of the hoodie.”

Pacioli does not claim that, either.

I wonder.  Why would a celibate monk be considered the father of anything?

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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The excitement is building in my house.  Why?  Accounting Day is fast approaching.

November 10 is the day we accountants commemorate a top 25 event in the world’s history–publishing the first book on accounting.

On November 10, 1494, volume 2 of Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalita (Everything About Arithmetic, Geometry and Proportion) was published.  It is in volume 2 of the Summa that Luca Pacioli included a description of the bookkeeping/accounting system of Venice.   In honor of this contribution, Pacioli has carried for centuries the title of Father of Accounting.

This year, I’ve decided to stand on the town’s busiest street corner and hand out small bags of beans for passers-by to count.  There will be jelly beans, pinto beans, and beans that give you gas.  It doesn’t matter what the beans are, because November 10 is our day.

If you’ve never celebrated Accounting Day before, please come to my party.  There will be numbers galore.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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accountantdaylargeIt is still November 10 up here in North Dakota.  That means it is still Accountant’s Day!

Did you get a chance to celebrate?  Professor Ed Scribner at New Mexico State University reminded his accounting theory students, and one brought a cake to class.  I’m on a diet, but I would break it for a slice of Accountant Day cake.

How did I celebrate?  I walked around campus reciting the debiti-credit cadence.  You don’t know what that is?  Instead of walking and saying, “a-left (pause) a-left (pause) a-left right left (pause)”, you say, “debit (pause) debit (pause) debit credit debit (pause).  I also tested students taking my courses on the finer points of accounting.   I’ll bet they are celebrating tonight.

As explained in a previous blog post, on November 10, 1494, volume 2 of Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalita (Everything About Arithmetic, Geometry and Proportion) was published.  It is in volume 2 of the Summa that Luca Pacioli included a description of the bookkeeping/accounting system of Venice.

Who says I don’t know how to have fun?  On Accountant’s Day I’m the life of the party.

accountantsday2009Now, back to the party.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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