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Posts Tagged ‘Accounting regulation’

Influential accounting news and commentary blog, Going Concern, is airing a series of interviews with key figures in the IFRS debate.  The second installment of the series, published April 1, 2010, features me.  Click on, “Professor David Albrecht: IFRS Will Make Financial Statement Comparison an Impossibility,” to read the interview.

Many thanks to the team at Going Concern (Caleb Newquist, managing editor) for thinking of me, and to ace reporter Adrienne Gonzalez (aka Junior Deputy Accountant) for the fine write-up.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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A panel discussion titled, ” Concerns Over U.S. Adoption of IFRS” will take place on Monday, Monday August 2, 2010 – 10:15 am-11:45 am at the annual meeting in San Francisco for the American Accounting Association (AAA).  The AAA is the primary professional organization for American accounting professors.

The panel discussion will feature internationally renowned accounting experts who have expressed concerns over some aspects of U.S. adoption of IFRS.  Tentatively scheduled participants are Ray Ball (University of Chicago), Shyam Sunder (Yale University), Charles Niemeier (PCAOB), Robert Jensen (Trinity University, retired), David Albrecht (Concordia College).  The session is moderated by David Albrecht (Concordia College).

The American Accounting Association’s 2010 Annual Meeting will be held in the Hilton San Francisco Union Square and the Parc 55 San Francisco in San Francisco, California, July 31 – August 4, 2010.  Registration for the annual meeting is required to attend this panel discussion.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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J. Edward Ketz is my round tuit.  ???  A round tuit is anything that unlocks your sense of inertia, allowing you to start working on some task that has been delayed far too long.

An example helps.  Have you, like me, ever been nailed for procrastinating?  All the time.  It probably followed this thought, “I’ll get a round tuit when there’s a free moment.”  But everything else doesn’t get done and there’s no free time, so you never get a round to it.

Ed is my round tuit.

On February 25, 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) released a formal Commission Statement in Support of Convergence and Global Accounting Standards.

I never got around to reacting.  Yesterday (March 29, 2010), Ed Ketz published his reaction, “The Iffiness of IFRS“.  It’s better than anything I can  write (anything Ed writes is always better than anything I can ever write, just take it for truth).  Better late than ever, here are my personal reactions.

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On February 25, 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) released a formal Commission Statement in Support of Convergence and Global Accounting Standards.

I never got around to reacting.  Today (March 29, 2010), Ed Ketz publishes his reaction, “The Iffiness of IFRS” at SmartPros.   It’s better than anything I can write (anything Ed writes is always going to be better than anything I can ever write, just take it for truth).  For those of you new to The Summa, Professor Ketz is a charter member of the group of IFRS critics.

For years, Ketz has railed (Merriam-Webster: to revile or scold in harsh, insolent, or abusive language) at the corporate practice of financial reporting.  He has repeatedly said that the number one problem is that corporations simply don’t follow the rules.  If ever they were all to be in a general state of compliance, then we could talk about about the structure of accounting standards.  But first, we need compliance.  Generally speaking, he favors specific accounting rules that permit no wiggle room.  Such rules make it easier to crack down on wrong-doers.

Professor Ketz’s latest editorial is “The Iffiness of IFRS.”  He responds to the SEC and suggests several issues that still need to be worked out before IFRS adoption.  Although the context for his remarks is opposing IFRS adoption, he believes the biggest problem with the proposed transition is:

… whether IFRS statements can be audited and what will happen in the courtroom after a firm experiences severe declines in its stock price.

Ketz concludes with:

… I again marvel at the rush to IFRS. The benefits do not appear to match or exceed the costs of the adoption.

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A single set of global accounting standards, rules to be followed by any public company as it reports annual operating results, has become the  Holy Grail of Accounting.  In today’s world, these rules are embodied in International Financial Reporting Standards. Unfortunately for many good but unwitting people, advocating the U.S. adoption of IFRS is a fool’s errand.   To more fully understand the ramifications of this statement let’s turn to the dictionary for a basic frame of reference.

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The U.S. government bears the societal responsibility for establishing accounting standards.  In its structure of economic regulation, the task for creating accounting standards is fixed on the Securities and Exchange Commission.  For seventy years the SEC has passed on its responsibilities, instead relying upon private U.S. organizations.   This has been called the Ostrich Syndrome (aka Head-in-Sand).  Now, the SEC proposes to rely upon a private international organization (IASB).  I call this the Some Sort of Ostrich Syndrome (aka Head-Where-It-Doesn’t-Need-to-Be).

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In yesterday’s Accountancy Age appeared an interesting piece by IFRS reporter-advocate Mario Christodoulou, “The long and winding roadmap”.  He does an adequate job, I think, even if he didn’t quote any of the many things I’ve said about U.S. adoption of or conversion with IFRS.

His quotation of fellow blogger Tom Selling statement of the differences between the GAAP and IFRS positions is priceless,

“Not only were Kroeker’s and Niemeier’s positions as different as black and white… Niemeier’s inspiration clearly sprang from a foundation of cited broad-based analyses produced by published rigorous, peer-reviewed, independent research.  The source of Kroeker’s remarks apparently came from nothing more than his own wishful thinking,” prominent blogger Tom Selling said in September last year.

I recall thinking at the time his statement was something that I very well might have written, had Tom not said it first.  There is every sound reason for the U.S. to retain its GAAP.  Reasons for switching to IFRS are specious, sophist all the way.

Christodoulou goes on to say that the push for IFRS has too much momentum for the U.S. to continue to buck the trend.  He might very well be right, but I’ll continue fighting it never-the-less.

Regardless, isn’t it time that someone came up with some good reasons for the U.S. to switch to IFRS?  No one has ever stated one.  Not that one is absolutely needed, because when governments decide to do something no good reason is needed.  I mean, didn’t Ben Bernanke say this week that the multi-billion USD bailout didn’t actually cost a single cent?  So, in government speak, Kroeker’s reason for moving to IFRS–for enhanced comparability–isn’t that bad.  Of course, it is a false reason and no on in the world truly believes it.  It is nonsensical.

And, governments frequently make bad decisions when it come time to regulate some aspect of society.  In deed, governments in North America are more likely to get something wrong than right.

But as I say, isn’t it about time that we had some real reasons for moving the U.S. to IFRS (convergence accomplishes pretty much the same thing as a switch-over)?  I have studied this topic for a few years.  Researching government regulation of accounting and auditing is what I do.  So far, I know of two reasons for the U.S. to switch to IFRS:

  1. Large audit firms hope to realize in excess of $100 billion in fees from services related to the switch over.  This represents a wealth transfer from stockholders.
  2. Europe hopes that when investors can compare U.S. and European companies using IFRS-generated statements, they will decide to move upwards of a couple trillion USD from the U.S. to Europe.

I am aware of no other benefits to any other identifiable party for the U.S. switching from GAAP to IFRS.  Shouldn’t there be some high-minded benefits from putting out so many millions of Americans and taxing the U.S. economy by a couple trillion dollars?  I just don’t think that putting money in audit-partner pockets so they can buy luxury goods, or whatever, is a good enough reason.

So come on, all of you pro-IFRS folks.  Kroeker has never come up with a reason for why the U.S. can make a change.  Please leave a comment and help us all out.  A good reason, or two, would make us all feel better.

Debit and credit –  – David Albrecht

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