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Posts Tagged ‘Blog awards’

Sooner or later, every blogger must ponder this question:  To toot or not to toot?

This blog post is about the role of posting credentials for those who professionally engage in social media.  It is not about being (or not being) awesome.

One of the social media world’s top bloggers–Mark Schaefer–wrote about it yesterday in, “Social Proof and Your Battle for Credibility.”

I promote blogging as an essential activity for cpa firms, professors and students. The sharing of ideas (i.e., content) through the written word is a terrific way of reaching clients, providing evidence of expertise, brand building, and initiating dialogue.  These are important ingredients in the building up and exercise of influence.

And blog promotion is an essential part of blogging, because if a blog has no readers, then it matters not if it exists.

In the quest for new readers, whether a blog writer is searching for more readers or the right readers, receiving critical acclaim is an effective means of establishing credibility.  Critical acclaim is widely used in various media outlets to attract readers, viewers or listeners.  Likewise, it can be used as a reason for why potential readers should visit and start reading a blog.

Mark Schaefer says,

When establishing online influence, social proof matters … even more than real achievement.

The Summa attracts readers from at least 150 countries each month.

I agree.  Social proof can be exhibited by posting badges like Klout scores, number of readers/followers and blog awards.  And I toot my own horn in the right margin of The Summa (number of accumulated page reads and a world map from where my readers long on).  Also, I once wrote a blog post about being named to the Accounting Today 2011 list of Top 100 Most Influential People in Accounting.  And The Summa has been mentioned on many Best Accounting Blogs lists.

However, yesterday Schaefer announced that for the time being he is removing his badges.  This decision results mostly from his acknowledgement that his ego finds such badges to be distracting, and contributes to him getting off message.

Good point.

I enjoy having readers and would like more.  But in the final analysis, I hope someday to be known for influencing the accounting world to be a better place.

If you write an accounting blog, I endorse your use of “badges.”  And if you read accounting blogs, I hope you understand that they serve a valid purpose other than ego stroking.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht


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