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Posts Tagged ‘IFRS critic’

Influential accounting news and commentary blog, Going Concern, is airing a series of interviews with key figures in the IFRS debate.  The second installment of the series, published April 1, 2010, features me.  Click on, “Professor David Albrecht: IFRS Will Make Financial Statement Comparison an Impossibility,” to read the interview.

Many thanks to the team at Going Concern (Caleb Newquist, managing editor) for thinking of me, and to ace reporter Adrienne Gonzalez (aka Junior Deputy Accountant) for the fine write-up.

Debit and credit – – David Albrecht

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J. Edward Ketz is my round tuit.  ???  A round tuit is anything that unlocks your sense of inertia, allowing you to start working on some task that has been delayed far too long.

An example helps.  Have you, like me, ever been nailed for procrastinating?  All the time.  It probably followed this thought, “I’ll get a round tuit when there’s a free moment.”  But everything else doesn’t get done and there’s no free time, so you never get a round to it.

Ed is my round tuit.

On February 25, 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) released a formal Commission Statement in Support of Convergence and Global Accounting Standards.

I never got around to reacting.  Yesterday (March 29, 2010), Ed Ketz published his reaction, “The Iffiness of IFRS“.  It’s better than anything I can  write (anything Ed writes is always better than anything I can ever write, just take it for truth).  Better late than ever, here are my personal reactions.

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On February 25, 2010, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) released a formal Commission Statement in Support of Convergence and Global Accounting Standards.

I never got around to reacting.  Today (March 29, 2010), Ed Ketz publishes his reaction, “The Iffiness of IFRS” at SmartPros.   It’s better than anything I can write (anything Ed writes is always going to be better than anything I can ever write, just take it for truth).  For those of you new to The Summa, Professor Ketz is a charter member of the group of IFRS critics.

For years, Ketz has railed (Merriam-Webster: to revile or scold in harsh, insolent, or abusive language) at the corporate practice of financial reporting.  He has repeatedly said that the number one problem is that corporations simply don’t follow the rules.  If ever they were all to be in a general state of compliance, then we could talk about about the structure of accounting standards.  But first, we need compliance.  Generally speaking, he favors specific accounting rules that permit no wiggle room.  Such rules make it easier to crack down on wrong-doers.

Professor Ketz’s latest editorial is “The Iffiness of IFRS.”  He responds to the SEC and suggests several issues that still need to be worked out before IFRS adoption.  Although the context for his remarks is opposing IFRS adoption, he believes the biggest problem with the proposed transition is:

… whether IFRS statements can be audited and what will happen in the courtroom after a firm experiences severe declines in its stock price.

Ketz concludes with:

… I again marvel at the rush to IFRS. The benefits do not appear to match or exceed the costs of the adoption.

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Note:  this is the final version of this essay.

This is part seven of an eight-part series in which I review the seven International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) critics (Sunder, Niemeier, Ball, Ketz, Selling, Jensen & Albrecht) of whom I am aware.  The series continues on regular posting dates, MWF.

In today’s essay, I review the anti-IFRS views of myself, David Albrecht, Ph.D.  An accounting professor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, I have been a vocal opponent of the proposed switchover in accounting standards for quite a while.  Until starting this blog two months ago, my primary forum was via posts to AECM, the e-mail listserv for accounting professors.

I am opposed to IFRS for the U.S. because (1) the politics of the decision are unwarranted, (2)  I believe it will be bad for the country, and (3) it will not aid the world in creating an integrated financial system. (more…)

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This is part six of an eight-part series in which I review the seven IFRS critics (Sunder, Niemeier, Ball, Ketz, Selling, Jensen & Albrecht) of whom I am aware.  The series continues on regular posting dates, MWF.

Robert E. Jensen

Robert E. Jensen

In today’s essay, I review the anti-IFRS views of Robert E. Jensen, Ph.D., as summarized from his posts to the AECM listserv (Accounting Education Using Computers and and Multimedia) and on his web site page on accounting standard setting controversies.

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This is part three of an eight-part series in which I review the seven IFRS critics (Sunder, Niemeier, Ball, Ketz, Selling, Jensen & Albrecht) of whom I am aware.  The series continues over the next two weeks on regular posting dates, MWF.

In today’s essay, I review Ray Ball’s very popular paper, “International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS): Pros and Cons for Investor.”  His paper, based on the P D Leake Lecture delivered on September 8, 2005 at the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, has since been published in a 2007 edition of Accounting & Business Research. A pre-publication version of the paper is available at SSRN.

Ray Ball, distinguished professor at Chicago.

Ray Ball, distinguished professor at University of Chicago.

Ray Ball’s opposition to IFRS gives instant intellectual respectability to the cause.  If one of the world’s smartest professors does not favor the SEC’s push to change accounting standards, then that should give the rest of us reason for doubt.

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A  series the arguments of seven prominent opponents to the U.S. adoption of IFRS.

Shyam Sunder–IFRS Critic (Yale professor)
Charles Niemeier–IFRS Critic (PCAOB member)
Ray Ball–IFRS Critic (Chicago professor)
Ed Ketz–IFRS Critic (Penn State professor)
Tom Selling–IFRS Critic (consultant, retired Thunderbird prof)
Bob Jensen–IFRS Critic (Trinity professor, emeritus)
David Albrecht–IFRS Critic (Concordia professor, was of Bowling Green)

Yet to write:  Comprehensive argument for IFRS in the USA

Yet to write:  Comprehensive argument against IFRS in the USA

Yet to write: Comparing and Evaluating Both Sides of the IFRS Issue

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