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Posts Tagged ‘Neutrality’

Thanks to Rick Telberg at CPATrendlines, I am now aware of Mary Schapiro’s latest comments on accounting (to the CFA Institute 2010 Annual Conference in Boston, Mass.).  We now have proof that the spirit of Professor Philip Barbay is alive and well inside the beltway.  You don’t remember Professor Philip Barbay?  He was the fool to Thornton Melon (played by Rodney Dangerfield) in the 1986 classic, Back to School.  Here’s the scene I best remember:

  • Dr. Phillip Barbay: …now, not withstanding Mr. Mellon’s input. The next question for us is where to build our factory?
  • Thornton Melon: how ’bout fantasyland?

The Rodney Dangerfield (I don’t get no respect) character got no respect from Professor Barbay, and we in the accounting world get no respect from SEC Chair Mary Schapiro.

Let’s take a close look at Schapiro’s remarks.

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On Developing a Worldview is proving to be a blog essay with legs.  It’s time to reveal the impetus for that piece.  In waning days of 2009, I received an e-mail:

Hello Professor Albrecht,

My name is Garrett D.; I am a recent graduate of an undergraduate accounting program currently serving in public practice as an audit associate in the Chicagoland area, and am interested in potentially pursuing a career in accounting academia. I have not applied to any programs as of yet, but am rather looking to acquire a fuller understanding of what it means to become an academic, and an accounting academic in particular. Hitherto, my exposure to this way of life has been limited to Stephen Zeff’s biography of Henry Rand Hatfield, fairly intermittent reading of the Financial Accounting Standards Research Initiative blog, and sporadic digestion of select accounting articles and monographs. Your blog has been of interest to me for a while now, and, upon reading your most recent post, “On Being a Blogging Professor,” I was struck by the emphasis you placed on developing a mature worldview as an accounting academic. Though I might be mistaken, I also recall you discussing the development of a “coherent worldview” as an accounting academic in previous posts. This “worldview development” imperative, alongside an intrinsic interest in education as a process, calling, and as a social phenomenon, is, as far as I can tell, primarily driving my interest in academia.

I am curious, if it is not too much trouble, if you will perhaps aid me in this effort to develop a coherent accounting worldview. Would you mind providing me with a recommended reading list of “accounting essentials” to add structure to my excursions within this discipline?

Thank you for your consideration.

Kind regards,
Garrett D.

Such a well-intentioned request.   I delivered On Developing a Worldview, in which the focus is on the process by which a person can acquire a worldview.  I promised a second essay in which I described the path I took in developing my own worldview.  But I didn’t promise a third essay, offering a reading list so that he could start working on his.  I never said never, I just didn’t say yes.

I delivered (and promised) only in part for two reasons.  First, I immediately saw value in a more general response for readers of The Summa.  I didn’t want to scare anyone off by being too detailed in my first essay.  Second, he was asking for something I didn’t have on hand.  So I shirked.   After I published On Developing a Worldview, Garret wrote back:

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